Tag Archives: witnessing

Refugee Film Festival

Who are the ‘refugees’ and what are their stories? How does the UK treat refugees and migrants? Which communities have provided shelter and offered support? What needs to change to solve the refugee ‘crisis’?

The Migrant And Refugee Solidarity group (MARS) at the University of Brighton organises this May a mini film festival in collaboration with migrant and refugee artists, activists and other local groups. All events will combine film screenings with talks and debates.

12 May, 19:00: Soccer My Saviour (2016) by Kyri Evangelou. This short documentary tells Rwandan football player’s Eric Murangwa’s story of survival in the genocide of 1994, how football saved Eric’s life, and how after the genocide he set up Football for Hope, Peace and Unity (FHPU). The screening will be followed by a panel discussion exploring the role of football in building tolerance and social cohesion both in the UK and overseas with the film’s star, Eric Murangwa, and the director, Kyri Evangelou. See the trailer for more details.

19 May, 19:00: Did you know that Gatwick hosts one of the biggest detention camps of the UK? BAD (Brighton Against Detention) are organising the festival’s second event around the catastrophic effects of UK asylum policy and what can be done about it. There will be three films: Working Illegally, Dear Jane, and Hidden Stories. Between the films there will be discussion with representatives of the ex-detainees’ All Women’s Africa Group. There will be information – and hopefully a debate – about can be done to address the immediate problems of detention.

26 May, 19:00: For the end of our short festival we have saved the premiere of a documentary film on a local art-community project: Homes for Refugees. What do refugees need to feel at home? What spaces can we create for refugees within local communities? What types of houses could we design? What buildings could be used? What structures could we build? What should they contain? Over the last months our home artists and activists are asking the local community to discuss those issues effecting both refugees looking for safe homes and existing inhabitants who may feel their communities are changing. Homes for Refugees is the film recording Brighton’s reply to the above questions.

All our events are FREE, open to all, and for educational purposes.
Screenings take place in room G7, at the ground floor of 10-11 Pavilion Parade. ( not wheelchair accessible – BN2 1RA – opposite the Pavilion and next to the Marlborough pub)

A related event, supported by MARS is the Global Opportunities Film Fundraiser on 23 May, organised in support of the University of Brighton’s Global Opportunities Scholarship programme, screening a series of short films which explore the dangers of fleeing to the UK. This is a FREE event but there is a suggested donation of £5.27 which is the UK daily allowance for asylum seekers and will be directed to the Global Opportunities Scholarship fund. (23 May at 18:00–20:30, at the University of Brighton Edward Street building)

A Walk In Solidarity with Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Detainees

Refugee Tales 2016
From Canterbury to Westminster

In June 2015 the Refugee Tales project walked in solidarity with Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Immigration Detainees, from Dover to Crawley along the North Downs Way. As the project walked it reclaimed the landscape of South East England for the language of welcome, and everywhere it stopped it was met with hospitality and enthusiasm. Working directly in collaboration with those who had experienced the UK asylum system, and taking Chaucer’s great poem of journeying as a model, established writers told a series of tales en route. Through that sharing of other people’s tales the project gathered and communicated experiences of migration, seeking to show, in particular, what indefinite detention means.

refugee tales

From July 3 to July 8 2016, Refugee Tales will walk again. Starting with a Day of Thought, Performance and Action on the issue of ‘Being Detained Indefinitely’ the project will leave Canterbury on July 4, moving north to Gravesend and then along the Thames into central London, calling once again for the practice of indefinite immigration detention to end. At every stop of the way leading writers will help tell the tales of asylum seekers, refugees and detainees, as well as the stories of those who work with them. As the project walks it will create a space in which the language of welcome is the prevailing discourse, a political carnival in which the act of listening is a common resource.

Since Refugee Tales walked first time the debate around human movement has fluctuated dramatically, as pressure for a change of policy on indefinite detention has continued to build. It is a cruel and debilitating practice that continues to do untold damage to tens of thousands of lives. From to Westminster, Refugee Tales will call again for indefinite detention to end.

for more information on Indefinite Detention, and about the project visit the Refugee Tales website.

Refugees and Humanitarian Crisis

A multi-disciplinary line-up starts with Professor Howard Rush who will critically analyse humanitarian responses in general. This will be followed by Dr Nicola Khan discussing mental health issues of asylum seekers and Jo Wilding addressing the impact of cuts to legal aid on asylum seekers. The session will finish with Professor Avril Loveless and Riam Ismael highlighting the importance of hearing the voices of refugees.

19 May, Thursday, Mithras House, Room G5, 15:10-17:00

full programme
– Niki Khan: Mental Health intervention for Afghan Migrants on the Move
– Avril Loveless: Refugee Tales
– Jo Wilding: Legal aid cuts, quality of asylum legal services and the refugee protection crisis
– Eugenia Markova: poster re: Refugee crisis
– Howard Rush: Strengthening the Humanitarian Innovation Ecosystem

Chair: Mark Doidge

The event is part of the annual Festival of Social Science and it is taking place within the MARS sponsored Refugee Month.

Refugee Rights and Community Responses

CUPP

23 May, 7pm. Free, non-ticketed [2hrs 25m]
M2 Grand Parade, University of Brighton
Ages 14+ Audience Interaction

Two dramatized pieces dealing with the rights and expectations of refugees:

Mustafa Y v. Secretary of State for the Home Department [2015]
Janina Moninska
In 2007 a Palestinian fleeing an UNRWA refugee camp in Lebanon, applied for Asylum in the UK. His appeal is still pending. This live art event created by Janina Moninska, will attempt to address the following questions:What is my responsibility towards those seeking refuge from conflict or resisting occupation in their homelands? What are our options for response as individuals, communities or citizens?

You, Me and the Distance Between Us
Ellen Muriel
A showcase of a new play under development. This one woman show uses music, storytelling and puppetry to address the expectations, experiences and insecurities of its performer in relation to the current ‘refugee crisis’: a white, middle class drama graduate who found herself volunteering in the midst of those making the journey across Europe.

This will be followed by a response from Professor Marie-Benedicte Dembour and Jo Wilding, specialists in human rights and asylum law at the University of Brighton, and a Q and A with the audience.

This event is part of MARS, Migrant and Refugee Solidarity month at the University of Brighton

Refugee Tales

Refugee Tales: why do we listen?

As scholars and researchers, how might we listen to the voices of refugees who tell tales of their experiences? What contribution or difference might listening make?  What effects might listening have on the story-tellers themselves? Come along to an informal lunchtime presentation and discussion of these questions.

Riam Ismael will tell us about her current MA research with Syrian refugees seeking to embark on Higher Education.
Professor Avril Loveless will tell us about ‘Refugee Tales’, a walk and tale-telling performance from Canterbury to London in solidarity with refugees and detainees in July.

Wednesday 11th May: 12 – 1.30(ish)
Room Checkland B406, Falmer, University of Brighton

All welcome – staff, students, friends. Bring your lunch. Bring your questions. Copies of ‘Refugee Tales’ published by Comma Press in April will be available.

This event is part of the MARS sponsored Refugee Month.